Adventures in Yeasted Doughs: Learning to Work With Yeast

Delicious yeasted cake topped with caramelized honeyed almonds - a bee sting cake, or bienenstich

I’ve mentioned here and there that one of my goals in 2017 is learning to work with yeast, and regularly making our own homemade bread. Yes, you can buy a cheap loaf of what passes for bread at the store; most stores also have bakeries that do a slightly better job. But those loaves tend to be pricey.

I think there’s also something satisfying about doing it yourself. I still have some vague aspirations towards homesteading (I’m going to try to grow some of our food this summer, for example). Bread baking taps into those mild feelings of self-sufficiency, and when you struggle with chronic depression, as I do, feeling like you’re Doing Something can really be a balm.

I like to think it also reduces waste somewhat; I’m less likely to toss the end of a homemade loaf, for example, and it eliminates the paper or plastic packaging from the store. I haven’t quite worked out yet what the efficiency difference is in my using my own oven versus the effectively communal oven at the store. I sort of assume that my keeping the ingredients at home versus those kept in a bakery is a wash, even if I use Prime Pantry (affiliate link), for example. Don’t quote me on that, though.

Yeast doughs can be intimidating. Here's one baker's journey to happy bread-baking.

Noodling on whether it’s actually worth it financially and environmentally, though, there’s the challenge. I’ve never been a natural at yeast doughs. My hands run hot, and somehow, even knowing that, I inevitably overflour during kneading and end up with dense, sort of yucky loaves. I’ve always used that as an excuse to not try very hard; I’ve had a few forays with bread machines, but I feel like they kind of smell funny and make weird loaves. I keep losing my KitchenAid’s dough hook, somehow. Et cetera.

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